Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Kiki Smith: Pool of Tears 2 (After Lewis Carroll), 2000.

When does a broken heart become a diagnosis?

Grief Could Join List of Disorders by BENEDICT CAREY
NYTIMES Published: January 24, 2012

The new report, by psychiatric researchers from Columbia and New York Universities, argues that the current definition of depression — which excludes bereavement, the usual grieving after the loss of a loved one — is far more accurate. If the “bereavement exclusion” is eliminated, they say, “there is the potential for considerable false-positive diagnosis and unnecessary treatment of grief-stricken persons.” Read More...

Monday, January 30, 2012

Vintage book cover

Sunday, January 29, 2012

Saturday, January 28, 2012

Friday, January 27, 2012

via: the sartorialist

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

elizabeth tubergen

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Kiki Smith Porcelain

Sunday, January 22, 2012

hair...

Friday, January 20, 2012

via:365blanc

RIP Etta James


NYTimes link

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Yoko Ono’s “Voice Piece for Soprano”

Monday, January 16, 2012

Derek Lam

Sunday, January 15, 2012

Friday, January 13, 2012

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Monday, January 9, 2012

Saturday, January 7, 2012

Friday, January 6, 2012

Thursday, January 5, 2012

via: velveteen

Backstage at Alexander McQueen

Wednesday, January 4, 2012

Revolution-Era Russian Theater.

The Blue Bird (French: L'Oiseau bleu) is a play by Belgian author Maurice Maeterlinck. It premiered on 30 September 1908 at Constantin Stanislavski's Moscow Art Theatre and has been turned into several films and a TV series. The French composer Albert Wolff wrote an opera (first performed at the N.Y. Metropolitan in 1919) based on Maeterlinck's original play.
The story is about a girl called Mytyl and her brother Tyltyl seeking happiness, represented by The Blue Bird of Happiness, aided by the good fairy BĂ©rylune.
Via:coilhouse

Tuesday, January 3, 2012

Via: vineet kaur

Joshua Bell, playing incognito in the D.C. Metro Station, organized by the Washington Post


"In Washington DC , at a Metro Station, on a cold January morning in 2007, a man with a violin played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, approximately 2000 people went through the station, most of them on their way to work. After about four minutes, a middle-aged man noticed that there was a musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds, and then he hurried on to meet his schedule. About four minutes later, the violinist received his first dollar. A woman threw money in the hat and, without stopping, continued to walk. At six minutes, a young man leaned against the wall to listen to him, then looked at his watch and started to walk again. At ten minutes, a three-year old boy stopped, but his mother tugged him along hurriedly. The kid stopped to look at the violinist again, but the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk, turning his head the whole time. This action was repeated by several other children, but every parent - without exception - forced their children to move on quickly. At forty-five minutes: The musician played continuously. Only six people stopped and listened for a short while. About twenty gave money but continued to walk at their normal pace. The man collected a total of $32. After one hour: He finished playing and silence took over. No one noticed and no one applauded. There was no recognition at all. No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the greatest musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, with a violin worth $3.5 million dollars. Two days before, Joshua Bell sold-out a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100 each to sit and listen to him play the same music. This is a true story. Joshua Bell, playing incognito in the D.C. Metro Station, was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste and people’s priorities. This experiment raised several questions: In a common-place environment, at an inappropriate hour, do we perceive beauty? If so, do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize talent in an unexpected context? One possible conclusion reached from this experiment could be this: If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world, playing some of the finest music ever written, with one of the most beautiful instruments ever made… How many other things are we missing as we rush through life?"

Monday, January 2, 2012

Yohji+Yamamoto+Spring 2012