Monday, August 14, 2017

Gertrud Vasegaard

In search of beauty today.

The Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded: Poems

Molly McCully Brown’s first book of poems, “The Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded,” is part history lesson, part séance, part ode to dread. It arrives as if clutching a spray of dead flowers. It is beautiful and devastating. 

The title refers to an actual place. The Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded was a government-run residential hospital in Amherst County, Va. It opened in 1910.
Its doctors were eugenicists. From the mid-1920s through the mid-1950s, thousands of patients, seen as defectives and moral nonentities, were sterilized without their consent. For many if not most of its residents, it was a house of horrors.
NYtimes article.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Favorite Pina Bausch scene

Ana Mendieta

Bird Transformation (1972) maps a transition from human to animal as Mendieta dresses the naked woman in feathers and thus transforms her into a bird-woman. Bird Transformation precedes and heralds Mendieta’s canonized Silueta series, which she began in Mexico in 1973, all of which show the artist’s silhouette in different landscapes, formed of various natural materials such as stones, twigs, driftwood and flowers.
Mendieta’s works revolve around themes like beauty, belonging, gender roles, female sexuality and men’s sexual oppression of women. Her work is associated with feminist performance pioneers in the USA, but her use of popular traditions and occult rituals, from among other places sources the Cuba from which she fled as a child, make her a loner.  Louisiana Museum of Art

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

pina bausch


Haruo Nakajima dies at 88

“One might regard him as a symbol of Japanese hate for the destruction that came out of nowhere and descended upon Hiroshima one pleasant August morn,” The New York Times wrote of the monster in a 1956 review of “Godzilla: King of the Monsters,” the English-dubbed version of the film released in North America. “But we assure you that the quality of the picture and the childishness of the whole idea do not indicate such a calculation. Godzilla was simply meant to scare people.” NYTIMES